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Athletic Training Major Chooses Business Minor

Feb 26 2014 2:00 PM
Athletic Training Major Chooses Business Minor
As an athletic training major in the College of Education and Human Sciences, Justine Bolton anticipates owning her own business. Getting a business minor from the College of Business Administration was a “no brainer” for her.

“If I work as an athletic trainer in a school system, I will operate a departmental budget. If I decide to go down the physical therapy path and own my own business, I will definitely need a business background,” she said.
Justine Bolton

Designed to complement any non-business major, the CBA business minor requires 18 hours of course work. Each student enrolls in six designated business classes in the areas of accounting, business law, economics, finance, marketing and management. Students can also tailor the classes to fit their schedules as courses are offered on-campus and online as well as during the fall, spring and summer.

Bolton, a junior from Blair, Neb., was a three sport athlete in high school. The volleyball, basketball and tennis player understands athletes and injuries, which led her down the athletic training career path. While in high school, she shadowed a local physical therapist but decided to major in athletic training at UNL.

“All I really want to do is make people feel better. Athletic training is understanding how the body works and coming up with a solution to make it perform better,” Bolton said. “It is similar to business in that you have to solve a problem with an answer based on different variables.”

Bolton understands the competitive advantage a business minor will offer her after she graduates.
“If you are not a business major, you should definitely get a minor as it will apply to your career regardless of whether you own the business or not. It just makes sense,” said Bolton.

Athletic Training Major Chooses Business Minor

Feb 26 2014 2:00 PM
Athletic Training Major Chooses Business Minor
As an athletic training major in the College of Education and Human Sciences, Justine Bolton anticipates owning her own business. Getting a business minor from the College of Business Administration was a “no brainer” for her.

“If I work as an athletic trainer in a school system, I will operate a departmental budget. If I decide to go down the physical therapy path and own my own business, I will definitely need a business background,” she said.
Justine Bolton

Designed to complement any non-business major, the CBA business minor requires 18 hours of course work. Each student enrolls in six designated business classes in the areas of accounting, business law, economics, finance, marketing and management. Students can also tailor the classes to fit their schedules as courses are offered on-campus and online as well as during the fall, spring and summer.

Bolton, a junior from Blair, Neb., was a three sport athlete in high school. The volleyball, basketball and tennis player understands athletes and injuries, which led her down the athletic training career path. While in high school, she shadowed a local physical therapist but decided to major in athletic training at UNL.

“All I really want to do is make people feel better. Athletic training is understanding how the body works and coming up with a solution to make it perform better,” Bolton said. “It is similar to business in that you have to solve a problem with an answer based on different variables.”

Bolton understands the competitive advantage a business minor will offer her after she graduates.
“If you are not a business major, you should definitely get a minor as it will apply to your career regardless of whether you own the business or not. It just makes sense,” said Bolton.