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Business Minors Provide Students with Skills in High Demand

Oct 31 2016 9:00 AM
Business Minors Provide Students with Skills in High Demand
Omaha native and University of Nebraska–Lincoln sophomore Luke Pavel transferred to Nebraska from a small college to complete a degree in advertising and public relations. Pavel, looking for a way to expand his skill set, added a business minor to round out his experience.

“When I transferred, coming from a small school in Iowa to a Big Ten school is like night and day. The first week I knew it was going to be a great fit. Also, most of my family had attended UNL and the advertising and public relations program here has a great reputation,”he said.
 
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Once he started taking classes, Pavel opted to add a business minor after talking to his academic advisor. The business minor for non-business majors, offered by the College of Business Administration, is open to all students at UNL. The 18-credit-hour minor provides a critical overview in areas such as accounting, business law, economics, finance, marketing and management.
 
“Business is part of our lives, and by adding this minor I feel like I can be prepared to use the skills I learn in AD/PR and combine that with business skills to be able to apply it to a wide range of things,” Pavel said.
 
Beginning this fall, the college expanded the business minor offerings to include minors in business analytics and entrepreneurship. The two new minors offer students a way to incorporate business basics and skills into any program of study.
 
The business analytics minor, which includes 12 credit hours, helps students build a solid technical foundation in data analysis and model-driven management decision-making skills. They also learn to leverage the power of big data to develop solutions to specific business problems. The minor allows them to meet high demands for the skills needed in multiple industries nationwide.
 
The entrepreneurship minor teaches students how to create successful businesses based on the expertise developed in their majors. Non-business majors will take 18 credit hours to complete the entrepreneurship minor while business majors can complete the minor with 12 credit hours.
 
“Students in these programs will have a competitive edge. I am excited about these new additions to our undergraduate programs. Both are examples of how we try to creatively respond to the changing needs for undergraduate education,” said Dr. Donde Plowman, James Jr. and Susan Stuart Endowed Dean.
 
Students should visit cba.unl.edu/businessminor for more information about each minor.Visit MyRed.unl.edu to enroll.

Business Minors Provide Students with Skills in High Demand

Oct 31 2016 9:00 AM
Business Minors Provide Students with Skills in High Demand
Omaha native and University of Nebraska–Lincoln sophomore Luke Pavel transferred to Nebraska from a small college to complete a degree in advertising and public relations. Pavel, looking for a way to expand his skill set, added a business minor to round out his experience.

“When I transferred, coming from a small school in Iowa to a Big Ten school is like night and day. The first week I knew it was going to be a great fit. Also, most of my family had attended UNL and the advertising and public relations program here has a great reputation,”he said.
 
CARMA logo
Once he started taking classes, Pavel opted to add a business minor after talking to his academic advisor. The business minor for non-business majors, offered by the College of Business Administration, is open to all students at UNL. The 18-credit-hour minor provides a critical overview in areas such as accounting, business law, economics, finance, marketing and management.
 
“Business is part of our lives, and by adding this minor I feel like I can be prepared to use the skills I learn in AD/PR and combine that with business skills to be able to apply it to a wide range of things,” Pavel said.
 
Beginning this fall, the college expanded the business minor offerings to include minors in business analytics and entrepreneurship. The two new minors offer students a way to incorporate business basics and skills into any program of study.
 
The business analytics minor, which includes 12 credit hours, helps students build a solid technical foundation in data analysis and model-driven management decision-making skills. They also learn to leverage the power of big data to develop solutions to specific business problems. The minor allows them to meet high demands for the skills needed in multiple industries nationwide.
 
The entrepreneurship minor teaches students how to create successful businesses based on the expertise developed in their majors. Non-business majors will take 18 credit hours to complete the entrepreneurship minor while business majors can complete the minor with 12 credit hours.
 
“Students in these programs will have a competitive edge. I am excited about these new additions to our undergraduate programs. Both are examples of how we try to creatively respond to the changing needs for undergraduate education,” said Dr. Donde Plowman, James Jr. and Susan Stuart Endowed Dean.
 
Students should visit cba.unl.edu/businessminor for more information about each minor.Visit MyRed.unl.edu to enroll.