News

News

Global Immersion: Nicholas Thomssen Germany Blog

Aug 1 2017 8:00 AM
Global Immersion: Nicholas Thomssen Germany Blog
Nicholas Thomssen, a senior international business major, is interning at Labfolder, an electronic lab notebook software company in Berlin for six months beginning in July. As a part of the international business major, students can pursue an international internship. The Lincoln, Nebraska native studied abroad in Spain and knew he wanted to return to Europe. “I wanted to learn what it is like to live and work abroad,” he said. “I love meeting new people from different nationalities and am looking forward to gaining international work experience.”

7/27/2017 – Food, Glorious Food

Germany is quite often synonymous with its cuisine. Pretzels, beer, bratwurst, mustard and sauerkraut are just a few of the many types of food to be found in Germany.
 
Berlin offers more diversity as it attracts people from all around the world. Over the past three-and-a-half weeks in Berlin, I have tried many different foods from across the world in one city. From Turkish food to Vietnamese food, you don’t have to go far for foods from all over the world.
 
Company picnic in the park.
Company picnic in the park.
Popular in German culture, the doner kebab is beef or chicken meat in a bread pocket with chili and garlic sauce and also some lettuce, tomato and onion. It is delicious and filling. The doner kebab was rumored to be invented in Berlin by Turkish immigrants following World War II. No matter its true origin, it is tasty and good food, and at around 3.50 euros ($4.11), it is a cheap meal. The kebab is found all over Europe yet surprisingly not in the U.S. I think it would sell extremely well there, and everyone would love it.
 
Another special food in Berlin is their most well-known street food, currywurst. This food is made by taking a normal German sausage and cutting it up into smaller pieces, drenching it in curry ketchup, and then putting curry powder on top. It is so delicious, and easy to find everywhere.
 
Of course, you cannot talk about German food without talking about bratwurst. You will find stands selling them all across the city. With a price under the equivalent of $2, you can’t go wrong for a cheap and easy snack.
 
The last food I will mention are pretzels. There are small bakery stands set up everywhere, even in most metro stations, selling freshly baked bread, pretzels and coffee. I remember back in the U.S. some sporting events would sell pretzels. But those were the cheap, frozen pretzels some guy would throw into the microwave, dust it with salt and then hand it to you with fake nacho cheese. But these are real German pretzels, and when you get one fresh out of the oven, they are extremely good.
 
Wherever you go in Berlin, you will find delicious food for cheap. Whether for a small snack or a filling meal, you cannot go wrong exploring the city to see exactly what it has to offer. 
 
7/17/2017 – Let’s Get to Work
 
Co-workers pose for a picture.
Co-workers pose for a picture.
This internship is my first real life experience in a regular “nine to five” office job. As a college student, I’m not really used to that much! I’m starting to get the hang of it. There is still a lot I do not know about the jobs I need to do, but I am only an intern, and my supervisor took me aside one day and told me that it’s ok if I don’t know everything. That is why I’m here, to learn and to grow.
 
When interns are depicted in movies or TV shows, you see them doing coffee runs for employees, doing pitiful monotonous work and being looked down upon by employees. A pleasant shock to me, I am not really treated as the “stereotypical intern.” The most I’ve had to do with that is on Mondays and Fridays, our company does team lunches, where the interns have to go get lunch for the rest of the company. However, the interns do not have to pay for the lunches. I am happy to do that work to save money rather than spending on my own lunch.
 
There is not just one thing I do every day, and the day does not usually have a set schedule of things that I do. So, there is not a typical day I could talk about. Today, for example, my supervisor was on vacation, but he had given me a list to do. I created a client list and checked with our sales software to see if they were in the system. Then, I went to go get team lunch. After lunch, I did research into search engine optimization to improve the language of our blog posts, then I researched types of clients we want to market to in order to get an idea of how to write articles to appeal to them. Lastly, I started a rough draft of a blog post about laboratory management.
 
I think I have to get used to the 40-hour weeks that working in an office job brings, but I have time. I am here for six months, so I will have to see how well I adapt to more of a working adult life.
 
7/6/2017 - The First Week
 
Traveling in Berlin.
Traveling in Berlin.
I have arrived safely in Berlin after 19 hours of flying, in which I did not sleep at all during the long flight over the Atlantic. I have currently been here for about four to five days as I write this, and I have been doing my best to get used to the city.
 
When I arrived in Berlin last Wednesday, I got hit with a momentous amount of jet lag. When you travel, each of us have to deal with jet lag in one way or another. The best way to conquer it is as soon as you arrive at your destination, get on the schedule immediately of the place where you are. This means eating meals when it is the appropriate time, and most importantly, do not take a nap as soon as you arrive. Do your best to stay up and continue on through the day until it is the actual time to go to bed. This will help in returning your sleep schedule to a normal balance.
 
Over the past few days, I have wandered around the city of Berlin, seeing the sights and getting the overall lay of the land. I started out visiting the more touristy areas of Berlin like the Brandenburg Gate, Alexanderplatz and the Fernsehturm, as well as the remains of the Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie. Since I had this time before my internship started, I wanted to be a “stereotypical tourist,” and also spending some time getting used to the subway system.
 
Honestly, the first few days are mostly about settling into a city. If you are going to be living there for a while, such as a full semester if you’re choosing to study abroad, you have time to enjoy the sites. Too many people have a long travel checklist. They frantically race from place to place trying to see all that the city has to offer, and yet they don’t enjoy what they see. Take your time. You do not have to see everything the first day.
 
This week, I have enjoyed the little moments of life. I use an app called Couchsurfing. There’s a feature where you can meet up with fellow travelers from all around the world who are also using the app. I met up with a few guys from Iceland, France and Turkey, and we went to a restaurant and watched a big soccer game between Germany and Chile. In that moment, I realized we need to hold onto and cherish moments like these. Life is more fun when you can enjoy the smaller things.
 
 
6/26/2017 - An Introduction of Sorts
 
I’ve thought for a while as to how I want to write this blog. I had seen several friends do study abroad programs where they each wrote a blog about their great experiences they had while traveling the world. When I studied abroad in fall 2015 in Spain, I decided not to keep a blog. Then, I got an internship in Germany, and I was offered to write a blog for the College of Business sharing my experience with an international internship. What made me want to do this? I want people to know about my travel experiences, so they themselves are inspired in a way that makes them want to go abroad as well.
 
Over the next six months, I look forward to motivating you as the reader to travel and live abroad to enhance your life. I will talk about what I’ve done, but also talk about tips for those looking to travel, as well as how I got here.
 
Today is the day before my flight leaves out of Omaha, and even though I’m writing about how great traveling is, I can’t help feel nervous and scared. Yet, it is a good nervous feeling and a good scary feeling. It is like the feeling you get before going on a roller coaster or the feeling you get when you finally get enough courage to ask your crush out on a date. It is a feeling of excitement mixed with anxiousness, and the reward is scores above the risk.
 
For those who have not studied abroad yet, I encourage you to visit the Education Abroad office at Nebraska, do research online and ask friends that have done it before (Keep reading this blog, of course, because I will share my own tips). For those who have already studied abroad, I want to talk about now how I got an internship outside of the country because that can seem like a daunting task.
 
After I returned from my study abroad program in Spain, I knew I wanted to go back as soon as possible. It was one of the best experiences of my life. The easiest way would be to do another study abroad program for another semester, but that did not really seem right for me. The next logical option was to find an internship either back in Spain or another country in Europe. It would not only give me international experience, but internship experience as well, adding some more character to my résumé.
 
So, I went to the Business Career Center in fall 2016, and an advisor gave me some good websites to use to apply through. For the first month, it was tough going. I had yet to have gotten a positive response from any company.
 
Then, in late October, I got a response. A company called Labfolder out of Berlin, Germany, had liked my résumé and decided to give me an interview over Skype. The interview went well, so they followed it up with a second interview and a writing test. On the day after my birthday in mid-December, I got a call from the HR Manager saying they would like to formally offer me the position. I was ecstatic. I would be returning to Europe slightly less than two years after I had left.
 
For those who wish to have an internship somewhere abroad, I have some tips for you in your search. First, send out a lot of résumés to many different companies in many different places. You never know which ones might respond. Along those same lines, do not be afraid to send a résumé to a company where you may not fit all of the criteria necessary. Lastly, be willing to accept a position that doesn’t fit exactly what you were thinking. Be willing to try something new, and be ready for anything.

Global Immersion: Nicholas Thomssen Germany Blog

Aug 1 2017 8:00 AM
Global Immersion: Nicholas Thomssen Germany Blog
Nicholas Thomssen, a senior international business major, is interning at Labfolder, an electronic lab notebook software company in Berlin for six months beginning in July. As a part of the international business major, students can pursue an international internship. The Lincoln, Nebraska native studied abroad in Spain and knew he wanted to return to Europe. “I wanted to learn what it is like to live and work abroad,” he said. “I love meeting new people from different nationalities and am looking forward to gaining international work experience.”

7/27/2017 – Food, Glorious Food

Germany is quite often synonymous with its cuisine. Pretzels, beer, bratwurst, mustard and sauerkraut are just a few of the many types of food to be found in Germany.
 
Berlin offers more diversity as it attracts people from all around the world. Over the past three-and-a-half weeks in Berlin, I have tried many different foods from across the world in one city. From Turkish food to Vietnamese food, you don’t have to go far for foods from all over the world.
 
Company picnic in the park.
Company picnic in the park.
Popular in German culture, the doner kebab is beef or chicken meat in a bread pocket with chili and garlic sauce and also some lettuce, tomato and onion. It is delicious and filling. The doner kebab was rumored to be invented in Berlin by Turkish immigrants following World War II. No matter its true origin, it is tasty and good food, and at around 3.50 euros ($4.11), it is a cheap meal. The kebab is found all over Europe yet surprisingly not in the U.S. I think it would sell extremely well there, and everyone would love it.
 
Another special food in Berlin is their most well-known street food, currywurst. This food is made by taking a normal German sausage and cutting it up into smaller pieces, drenching it in curry ketchup, and then putting curry powder on top. It is so delicious, and easy to find everywhere.
 
Of course, you cannot talk about German food without talking about bratwurst. You will find stands selling them all across the city. With a price under the equivalent of $2, you can’t go wrong for a cheap and easy snack.
 
The last food I will mention are pretzels. There are small bakery stands set up everywhere, even in most metro stations, selling freshly baked bread, pretzels and coffee. I remember back in the U.S. some sporting events would sell pretzels. But those were the cheap, frozen pretzels some guy would throw into the microwave, dust it with salt and then hand it to you with fake nacho cheese. But these are real German pretzels, and when you get one fresh out of the oven, they are extremely good.
 
Wherever you go in Berlin, you will find delicious food for cheap. Whether for a small snack or a filling meal, you cannot go wrong exploring the city to see exactly what it has to offer. 
 
7/17/2017 – Let’s Get to Work
 
Co-workers pose for a picture.
Co-workers pose for a picture.
This internship is my first real life experience in a regular “nine to five” office job. As a college student, I’m not really used to that much! I’m starting to get the hang of it. There is still a lot I do not know about the jobs I need to do, but I am only an intern, and my supervisor took me aside one day and told me that it’s ok if I don’t know everything. That is why I’m here, to learn and to grow.
 
When interns are depicted in movies or TV shows, you see them doing coffee runs for employees, doing pitiful monotonous work and being looked down upon by employees. A pleasant shock to me, I am not really treated as the “stereotypical intern.” The most I’ve had to do with that is on Mondays and Fridays, our company does team lunches, where the interns have to go get lunch for the rest of the company. However, the interns do not have to pay for the lunches. I am happy to do that work to save money rather than spending on my own lunch.
 
There is not just one thing I do every day, and the day does not usually have a set schedule of things that I do. So, there is not a typical day I could talk about. Today, for example, my supervisor was on vacation, but he had given me a list to do. I created a client list and checked with our sales software to see if they were in the system. Then, I went to go get team lunch. After lunch, I did research into search engine optimization to improve the language of our blog posts, then I researched types of clients we want to market to in order to get an idea of how to write articles to appeal to them. Lastly, I started a rough draft of a blog post about laboratory management.
 
I think I have to get used to the 40-hour weeks that working in an office job brings, but I have time. I am here for six months, so I will have to see how well I adapt to more of a working adult life.
 
7/6/2017 - The First Week
 
Traveling in Berlin.
Traveling in Berlin.
I have arrived safely in Berlin after 19 hours of flying, in which I did not sleep at all during the long flight over the Atlantic. I have currently been here for about four to five days as I write this, and I have been doing my best to get used to the city.
 
When I arrived in Berlin last Wednesday, I got hit with a momentous amount of jet lag. When you travel, each of us have to deal with jet lag in one way or another. The best way to conquer it is as soon as you arrive at your destination, get on the schedule immediately of the place where you are. This means eating meals when it is the appropriate time, and most importantly, do not take a nap as soon as you arrive. Do your best to stay up and continue on through the day until it is the actual time to go to bed. This will help in returning your sleep schedule to a normal balance.
 
Over the past few days, I have wandered around the city of Berlin, seeing the sights and getting the overall lay of the land. I started out visiting the more touristy areas of Berlin like the Brandenburg Gate, Alexanderplatz and the Fernsehturm, as well as the remains of the Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie. Since I had this time before my internship started, I wanted to be a “stereotypical tourist,” and also spending some time getting used to the subway system.
 
Honestly, the first few days are mostly about settling into a city. If you are going to be living there for a while, such as a full semester if you’re choosing to study abroad, you have time to enjoy the sites. Too many people have a long travel checklist. They frantically race from place to place trying to see all that the city has to offer, and yet they don’t enjoy what they see. Take your time. You do not have to see everything the first day.
 
This week, I have enjoyed the little moments of life. I use an app called Couchsurfing. There’s a feature where you can meet up with fellow travelers from all around the world who are also using the app. I met up with a few guys from Iceland, France and Turkey, and we went to a restaurant and watched a big soccer game between Germany and Chile. In that moment, I realized we need to hold onto and cherish moments like these. Life is more fun when you can enjoy the smaller things.
 
 
6/26/2017 - An Introduction of Sorts
 
I’ve thought for a while as to how I want to write this blog. I had seen several friends do study abroad programs where they each wrote a blog about their great experiences they had while traveling the world. When I studied abroad in fall 2015 in Spain, I decided not to keep a blog. Then, I got an internship in Germany, and I was offered to write a blog for the College of Business sharing my experience with an international internship. What made me want to do this? I want people to know about my travel experiences, so they themselves are inspired in a way that makes them want to go abroad as well.
 
Over the next six months, I look forward to motivating you as the reader to travel and live abroad to enhance your life. I will talk about what I’ve done, but also talk about tips for those looking to travel, as well as how I got here.
 
Today is the day before my flight leaves out of Omaha, and even though I’m writing about how great traveling is, I can’t help feel nervous and scared. Yet, it is a good nervous feeling and a good scary feeling. It is like the feeling you get before going on a roller coaster or the feeling you get when you finally get enough courage to ask your crush out on a date. It is a feeling of excitement mixed with anxiousness, and the reward is scores above the risk.
 
For those who have not studied abroad yet, I encourage you to visit the Education Abroad office at Nebraska, do research online and ask friends that have done it before (Keep reading this blog, of course, because I will share my own tips). For those who have already studied abroad, I want to talk about now how I got an internship outside of the country because that can seem like a daunting task.
 
After I returned from my study abroad program in Spain, I knew I wanted to go back as soon as possible. It was one of the best experiences of my life. The easiest way would be to do another study abroad program for another semester, but that did not really seem right for me. The next logical option was to find an internship either back in Spain or another country in Europe. It would not only give me international experience, but internship experience as well, adding some more character to my résumé.
 
So, I went to the Business Career Center in fall 2016, and an advisor gave me some good websites to use to apply through. For the first month, it was tough going. I had yet to have gotten a positive response from any company.
 
Then, in late October, I got a response. A company called Labfolder out of Berlin, Germany, had liked my résumé and decided to give me an interview over Skype. The interview went well, so they followed it up with a second interview and a writing test. On the day after my birthday in mid-December, I got a call from the HR Manager saying they would like to formally offer me the position. I was ecstatic. I would be returning to Europe slightly less than two years after I had left.
 
For those who wish to have an internship somewhere abroad, I have some tips for you in your search. First, send out a lot of résumés to many different companies in many different places. You never know which ones might respond. Along those same lines, do not be afraid to send a résumé to a company where you may not fit all of the criteria necessary. Lastly, be willing to accept a position that doesn’t fit exactly what you were thinking. Be willing to try something new, and be ready for anything.