Research

Is Economics Coursework, or Majoring in Economics, Associated with Different Civic Behaviors?

Using data collected from graduates who attended four large public universities in 1976, 1986, or 1996, the authors investigate the relationship between studying economics and civic behaviors. They compare students who majored in economics, business, or other majors, and by the number of undergraduate economics courses completed. Coursework is strongly associated with political party affiliation and donating money to candidates or parties, but not with voting in presidential, state, or local elections, nor with the likelihood or intensity of volunteerism. Business majors are less likely to engage in voting and volunteering. More economics coursework is usually associated with attitudes on policy issues closer to those reported in surveys of U.S. economists, while attitudes of business majors are more like those of general majors than economics majors.

Publication Information
Article Title: Is Economics Coursework, or Majoring in Economics, Associated with Different Civic Behaviors?
Journal: Journal of Economic Education (2012)
43(3) 248-268
Author(s): Allgood, Sam;  Bosshardt, William H;  van der Klaauw, Wilbert;  Watts, Michael
Researcher Information
    
Allgood, Sam
Allgood, Sam
Edwin J. Faulkner Professor of Economics
Expertise:
  • Economic Education
  • Labor Economics (wages, employment, working conditions, unions)
  • Microeconomics
Economics
CoB 525 V
P.O. Box 880489
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0489, USA
Phone: (402) 472-3367
Fax: (402) 472-9700
sallgood1@unl.edu