Research

The Dominant Social Paradigm, Consumption, and Environmental Attitudes: Can Marketing Education Help?

It has been argued that the dominant social paradigm (DSP) of Western industrial societies is complicit in environmental decline. In the present research, the DSP and its elements and their relation to consumption behavior are first addressed in classes on social responsibility that are taught in a business school. Two quasi-experiments are then conducted using an after-only with control group design (Study 1) and a before-after with control group design (Study 2). In both studies, attitudes of students in the social responsibility classes are compared to control groups of marketing students to determine the effects of instruction on the DSP and environmental attitudes. Findings suggest that lower scores on the DSP for the experimental group result in increased measures of environmental attitudes and perception of change necessary to ameliorate environmental degradation. However, in neither experiment does willingness to change one's own behavior materialize.

Publication Information
Article Title: The Dominant Social Paradigm, Consumption, and Environmental Attitudes: Can Marketing Education Help?
Journal: Journal of Macromarketing (Jun, 2008)
Vol. 28 Issue 2, p106-121,
Author(s): Kilbourne, W.E.;  Carlson, Les
Researcher Information
    
Carlson, Les
Carlson, Les
Professor and Nathan J. Gold Distinguished Professorship
Expertise:
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Consumer Socialization
  • Marketing Communication
  • Services Marketing
Marketing
CoB 345K
P.O. Box 880492
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0492, USA
Phone: (402) 472-3156
Fax: (402) 472-9777
lcarlson3@unl.edu