Adult and Teen Internet Safety Perceptions and Behaviors: A Comparative Protection Motivation Theory Examination

The current paper compares threat and coping behaviors of parents and their teens on the usage of protective online behaviors by examining 142 matched-pair, parent-teen dyads. Specifically we examine how the relationship between threat and coping appraisals and protective Internet behavior usage differs between parents and their teen-aged children. Further, we study the role of parental involvement on teen protective behavior usage by comparing the perception of involvement levels across the two groups as well as whether parent protective behavior usage predicts teen protective behavior usage. The findings provide mixed support for the hypotheses and suggest that the impact of response efficacy on the use of protective online behavior is higher for teens as compared to parents. However, our results also suggest that the impact of self-efficacy on the protective online behaviors to be higher for parents as compared to teens which is opposite to expectations. The results also suggest that parents had higher levels of perceived parental involvement compared to teens’ perceptions of parental involvement. We conclude the paper by providing implications regarding different marketing strategies across the two groups.
Presentation Information
Paper Title: Adult and Teen Internet Safety Perceptions and Behaviors: A Comparative Protection Motivation Theory Examination
Conference: American Marketing Assocation Winter Educators' Conference (2012)
Author(s): Johnson, J.;  Gupta, S.;  Carlson, Les;  Rifon, N. J.;  LaRose, R.;  Quilliam, E.
Researcher Information
    
Carlson, Les
Carlson, Les
Professor and Nathan J. Gold Distinguished Professorship
Expertise:
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Consumer Socialization
  • Marketing Communication
  • Services Marketing
Marketing
CoB 345K
P.O. Box 880492
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0492, USA
Phone: (402) 472-3156
Fax: (402) 472-9777
lcarlson3@unl.edu