Funding Opportunities

Jo Ann Emerson is the proposal development coordinator hired by The College of Business Administration to assist faculty in preparing and submitting proposals to fund research. If you would like a consultation, contact Jo Ann Emerson at or stop by room 356A to visit. Funding Opportunities is a select list of current grant opportunities issued by federal agencies, private foundations, and a variety of other funding sources.

You may wish to review (available at for additional funding opportunities. centralizes more than 1,000 grant programs across all 26 federal grant-making agencies.

Proposal development assistance for CBA faculty includes:

  1. identifying potential funding sources based on faculty research areas
  2. initiating and managing collaborator and/or team meetings
  3. editing, timeline management, budget, and submission assistance
  4. collaborating with investigators and their project teams to develop competitive grant proposals from initial draft to final submission

Foundations with rolling or multiple deadlines:

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

FINRA Investor Education Foundation 

National Endowment for Financial Information


Helpful tips:

Your Data Management Plan is a key component to a successful proposal.  Visit this link for detailed information, templates, and assistance.

When planning your submission timeline, make sure you know what supplemental documents are required.  Sometimes these can trip you up!

For assistance preparing a competitive proposal, contact Jo Ann Emerson by email: or stop by CBA 356A.

National Science Foundation
Dear Colleague Letter--Invitation to Submit Topic Ideas
Application Deadline: 10/31/2016

The purpose of this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) is to invite the research community to submit suggestions for Topic Ideas to be considered for the FY 2018 Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) Program Solicitation.

Suggestions for EFRI Topic Ideas are currently solicited and vetted every two years. Selected Topic(s) become the focus of research supported by the EFRI Program. Solicitations are announced annually for research proposals that fall under the specified Topic area(s).

This DCL is not a request for submission of a single research proposal idea; rather, it is designed to solicit submission of emerging topic areas of potentially transformative research and innovation. You may submit your candidate topic idea along with a 500-word description at:

National Science Foundation
Advancing Informal STEM
Application Deadline: 11/08/2016

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.


The AISL program supports seven types of projects: (1) Collaborative Planning, (2) Exploratory Pathways, (3) Research in Service to Practice, (4) Innovations in Development, (5) Broad Implementation, (6) Conferences, and (7) Informal STEM Learning Resource Center (FY 2016 only).


For additional information, go to

Russell Sage Foundation
Small Grants in Behavioral Economics
Application Deadline: 12/01/2016

The Russell Sage Behavioral Economics Roundtable supports a small grants research program to support high-quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators (Ph.D. students and recent graduates) to enter this developing field.

There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the principal investigator, and the proposed research may address any topic in behavioral economics. However, projects must contribute to the Foundation's mission to improve the social and living conditions in the U.S. Appropriate projects will demonstrate explicit use of psychological concepts in the motivation of the research design and the preparation of the results. Experimental projects which do not have substantial behavioral content (such as market experiments testing neoclassical ideas) or substantial economic content (such as psychology experiments with no economic choices or strategic or market implications) will not be funded.

There is a $7,500 lifetime limit for these small grants.

To apply:

  1. Visit our on-line application portal, create an account, and start a new "BE Small Grant" application;
  2. Submit a proposal (1000 words max.);
  3. Submit a budget;
  4. Submit an up-to-date abbreviated CV (maximum of 5 pages);
  5. Submit a fiscal agent letter;
  6. Submit a letter of recommendation from faculty advisor (doctoral students only);
  7. Submit official transcripts (doctoral students only).

There is no deadline for the Small Grants Program in Behavioral Economics; applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

National Science Foundation
Enabling New Collaborations Between Computer and Information Science & Engineering (CISE) and Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) Research Communities
Application Deadline: 12/01/2016

Opportunity for collaborative research projects. 

With this DCL, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is announcing its intention to build upon the success of previous EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGERs) in the areas supported by the Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program (see NSF 16-580, and to encourage the submission of additional EAGER proposals that foster novel interdisciplinary research carried out in new collaborations between one or more Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) researchers and one or more Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) researchers. Note that this DCL is focused on new collaborations; research teams with a history of collaborating together should instead submit directly to the SaTC solicitation, pursuant to the proposal preparation guidelines specified therein.

Many scientific and practical challenges of security, privacy, and trust have sociotechnical dimensions, and thus it is important to encourage interdisciplinary collaborations among researchers from the disciplines represented in NSF’s CISE and SBE directorates, and on topics that draw on the strengths of each researcher.

Below are some examples of the types of topics that might benefit from collaborations between CISE and SBE researchers under such an EAGER project. This list is by no means intended to be directive or complete. Many important problems demand strong research reflecting integrative perspectives.


  • Ethical, political, legal, cultural, or societal dimensions of security and privacy technologies and their impacts.
  • Security/privacy in the context of social media, including topics such as data aggregation and algorithmic filtering.
  • Addressing online behavioral risks to security, safety, and/or privacy, including trolling, spamming and cyberbullying.
  • Interaction design research on how to accommodate individual and/or collective privacy values and concerns.
  • Inclusive security or privacy mechanisms that adapt to the needs and abilities of underrepresented or disabled individuals or groups.
  • Research on education, training, and awareness around security and privacy for both users and developers of secure and trustworthy systems.
  • Understanding and supporting responses to cyber attacks, ranging from the individual to national scales.
  • Security/privacy at the level of families, groups, communities, and other understudied levels/units of analysis.
  • Organizational strategies, investments, or governance effects on security/privacy, and approaches for improvement.
  • Studies of economic dimensions of security or privacy decision-making, including cost-benefit analyses, incentive structures, and/or mechanism design.
  • Methods for modeling intentions and/or behaviors relevant to cybersecurity. For example, methods could include social network analysis, crowdsourcing, and inter-organizational policy analysis, and combinations thereof.

Dear Colleague Letter (DCL): Enabling New Collaborations Between Computer and Information Science & Engineering (CISE) and Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) Research Communities

National Endowment for Financial Education
Research Grant Program, LOI
Application Deadline: 12/06/2016

The foundation welcomes multiple LOIs from the same proposer and the same institution.  

Guidelines and Eligibility for NEFE Grants and Research Program (the website has additional information)

The grants program seeks innovative research that can make a profound contribution to the field of financial literacy. Inquiries are encouraged from disciplines in fields as diverse as: Behavior, Marketing, Economics, Finance, Neuroscience, Education, Sociology, Change Theory, Psychology, Decision Sciences, and others

Project outcomes should be actionable in the field of financial literacy, directly relevant to the financial well-being of the public, and able to be applied broadly. Grant amounts range from $100,000 to $150,000 for between 12 and 36 months.

National Science Foundation
Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate
Application Deadline: 12/09/2016

The Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success for historically underrepresented minority doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty, particularly African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders, in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields. New and innovative models are encouraged, as are models that reproduce and/or replicate existing evidence-based alliances in significantly different disciplines, institutions, and participant cohorts. The AGEP program goal is to increase the number of historically underrepresented minority faculty, in specific STEM disciplines and STEM education research fields, by advancing knowledge about pathways to career success. The program objectives include: To support the development, implementation and study of innovative models of doctoral education, postdoctoral training, and faculty advancement for historically underrepresented minorities in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields; and to advance knowledge about the underlying issues, policies and practices that have an impact on the participation, transitions and advancement of historically underrepresented minorities in the STEM academy. The AGEP Transformation Alliance projects are collaborative research projects representing new strategic alliances of institutions and organizations to develop, implement, and study evidence-based models to transform doctoral education, postdoctoral training, and faculty advancement for historically underrepresented minorities in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields. Embedded social science and education research contributes to the knowledge base about how transformational models eliminate or mitigate negative factors and promote positive policies and practices for historically underrepresented minorities. AGEP addresses academic workforce development in a broadening participation and institutional capacity building context. Strategic collaborations are encouraged with multiple academic partners, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, professional organizations, government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and other relevant STEM and/or STEM education research organizations. The AGEP program encourages project leadership by, and partnerships with, all types of minority serving institutions, such as majority minority serving institutions, historically black colleges and universities, high Hispanic enrollment institutions, tribal colleges and universities, and institutions serving native Hawaiians, native Pacific Islanders, and/or Alaskan natives. Note to students and postdoctoral scholars seeking support: The AGEP program does not make awards to individual students or postdoctoral scholars to undertake their education or research activities. 

For more information, go to

National Science Foundation
Application Deadline: 12/14/2016

Letters of Intent: Submission of Letters of Intent is required. Please see the full text of this solicitation for further information.

The goals of the ADVANCE program are (1) to develop systemic approaches to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic STEM[1] careers; (2) to develop innovative and sustainable ways to promote gender equity that involve both men and women in the STEM academic workforce; and (3) to contribute to the research knowledge base on gender equity and the intersection of gender and other identities in STEM academic careers. The ADVANCE program contributes to the development of a more diverse science and engineering workforce because of the focus on equity for STEM academic faculty who are educating, training, and mentoring undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scholars.

For more information, go to

Department of Health and Human Services
Encouraging Appropriate Care Using Behavioral Economics through Electronic Health Records
Application Deadline: 12/30/2016

LOI due December 30; full proposal due January 30, 2017

Research Objectives 

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications proposing to apply behavioral economics principles to build interventions into electronic health records (EHRs) for the purpose of improving physician compliance with recommended treatment guidelines, thereby improving quality of care and health outcomes and reducing health disparities.  Given impressive previous successes in radically changing physicians’ behavior in antibiotics trials, behavioral economics is thought to provide potentially effective tools to enhance the adherence of clinical guidelines by health-care providers.  Behavioral economics techniques have been shown to change physician behavior in prescribing antibiotics but have not been studied adequately for implementing guidelines across diverse health conditions and clinical settings, leaving a substantial opportunity for improvements that could be met, in part, through research supported by this FOA.

for additional information, go to

National Science Foundation
Application Deadline: 01/18/2017

The Economics program supports research designed to improve the understanding of the processes and institutions of the U.S. economy and of the world system of which it is a part. This program also strengthens both empirical and theoretical economic analysis as well as the methods for rigorous research on economic behavior. It supports research in almost every area of economics, including econometrics, economic history, environmental economics, finance, industrial organization, international economics, labor economics, macroeconomics, mathematical economics, and public finance.

The Economics program welcomes proposals for individual or multi-investigator research projects, doctoral dissertation improvement awards, conferences, workshops, symposia, experimental research, data collection and dissemination, computer equipment and other instrumentation, and research experience for undergraduates. The program places a high priority on interdisciplinary research. Investigators are encouraged to submit proposals of joint interest to the Economics Program and other NSF programs and NSF initiative areas. The program places a high priority on broadening participation and encourages proposals from junior faculty, women, other underrepresented minorities, Research Undergraduate Institutions, and EPSCoR states.

The program also funds conferences and interdisciplinary research that strengthens links among economics and the other social and behavioral sciences as well as mathematics and statistics.

The Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants funding opportunity is designed to improve the quality of dissertation research. DDRIG awards provide funds for items not normally available through the student's university such as enabling doctoral students to undertake significant data-gathering projects and to conduct field research in settings away from their campus. DDRIGs do not provide cost-of-living or other stipends or tuition. Outstanding DDRIG proposals specify how the knowledge to be created advances economics science. 

For more information,

National Science Foundation
Dear Colleague Letter--Opportunities for Research in Smart & Connected Communities
Application Deadline: 01/31/2017
NSF 16-140

Dear Colleague Letter: Opportunities for Research in Smart & Connected Communities


September 26, 2016

Dear Colleague:

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), Education and Human Resources (EHR), Engineering (ENG), Geosciences (GEO), and Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) wish to notify the community of various opportunities to support, foster,and accelerate fundamental research and education that addresses challenges in enabling Smart & Connected Communities (S&CC). This DCL amplifies and extends NSF's broader efforts in Smart & Connected Communities, and aligns with the National Smart Cities Initiative and the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) report onTechnology and the Future of Cities.

Since the White House announced the Smart Cities Initiative in September 2015, NSF has been working with diverse community stakeholders to formulate research directions and create new funding opportunities. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, NSF's investments have enabled pursuit of fundamental understanding and basic research in frameworks that: (a) integrate and operate on data from multiple sources at multiple temporal and spatial scales; (b) involve new sociotechnical systems that are interconnected and interdependent; and (c) develop and test new technologies for innovative applications and services to enable more livable, workable, and sustainable communities.

Looking forward, NSF envisions a multi-pronged strategy to build on its FY 2016 investments.

This strategy is intended to advance both disciplinary and multidisciplinary science and engineering foundations as well as build research capacity to improve understanding of local communities and advance discoveries and innovation that will ultimately enhance the quality of life within them. In particular, for FY 2017, NSF envisions a portfolio of funding opportunities and activities that include (but are not limited to):

  • Developing integrative social and technological research foundations for S&CC through strong, multidisciplinary efforts that may span institutions, stakeholder groups, and application areas;
  • Coupling research with community engagement to inform research directions and enable greater community impact;
  • Supporting research through NSF's core and cross-cutting programs to enable and address solutions to current and future challenges;
  • Piloting and evaluating novel solutions to local community challenges — with attention to privacy, security, and quality of life of individuals within communities;
  • Efforts to understand population characteristics and factors that inhibit or advance participation in technology;
  • Capacity-building activities to develop collaborations and partnerships through short-term planning activities and longer-term research direction-setting within the research and stakeholder communities, and to engage students and learners of all ages in addressing challenges relevant to S&CC;
  • Supporting and building international partnerships that leverage research strength and capacity in other parts of the world; and
  • Workshops that bring together diverse stakeholders including academics, community members, Federal agency partners, and others to identify strategic gaps, synergistic opportunities, and avenues for effective transition of research to practice.
  • For more information about current and future funding opportunities in S&CC, please see the NSF S&CC website ( or contact the following directorate S&CC points of contact: Sunil Narumalani, SBE,
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation Research Traineeship Program (NRT)
Application Deadline: 02/07/2017

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative models for STEM graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that ensure that graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. The NRT program includes two tracks: the Traineeship Track and the Innovations in Graduate Education (IGE) Track. The Traineeship Track is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs. For FY2016, there are four priority areas: (1) Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (DESE), (2) Understanding the Brain (UtB), (3) Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water Systems (INFEWS), and (4) any other interdisciplinary research theme of national priority. The priority research areas for the FY2017 competition will be (1) UtB, (2) INFEWS, and (3) any other interdisciplinary research theme of national priority.

The IGE Track focuses on test-bed projects aimed at piloting, testing, and validating innovative and potentially transformative approaches to graduate education. IGE projects are intended to generate the knowledge required for their customization, implementation, and broader adoption. While the Traineeship Track promotes building on the current knowledge base to develop comprehensive programs to effectively train STEM graduate students, the IGE Track supports testing of novel models or activities with high potential to enrich and extend the knowledge base on effective graduate education approaches. The NRT program addresses both workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. For both tracks, strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged.

National Science Foundation
Research Experiences for Undergraduates
Application Deadline: 05/26/2017

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites are based on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REU Sites may be based in a single discipline or academic department or may offer interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. (2) REU Supplements may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements or may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects. Undergraduate student participants in either REU Sites or REU Supplements must be U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or permanent residents of the United States. Students do not apply to NSF to participate in REU activities. Students apply directly to REU Sites or to NSF-funded investigators who receive REU Supplements. 

Defense Logistics Agency
Emergent II Research and Development
Application Deadline: 04/19/2019

The purpose of this Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) is to request interested parties to submit either an initial synopsis, commonly referred to as a "white paper," or a technical proposal relating to any BAA area of interest listed in the document. Two CBA-relevant areas of interest in the document:

  • Transportation and Management Logistics: to reduce transportation costs and achieve logistics efficiencies in the DLA supply chain, with particular focus on inbound procurement shipments and direct vendor deliveries. (see page 5).

  • Medical Logistics: to identify and resolve medical logistics support challenges at low cost (see page 5).

Access the BAA here:

Open through April 2019. 



Agency for International Development (USAID)
Research and Innovation for Health Supply Chain Systems and Commodity Security
Application Deadline: 05/28/2019

The purpose of this APS is to publicize the United States Government's (USG) plan to fund a limited number of awards through the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Washington Global Health Bureau (GH) to: support research on a focused set of health supply chain systems and related commodity security issues in low and middle income countries.

Funds may support:(a) Formative, analytical research on challenges to improving supply chain systems and the enabling environments for commodity security; and/or (b) Development and testing of interventions in the field based on formative research conducted under this Annual Program Statement (APS) or from other sources.

Cost share required. Open throuh May 2019. 

Full solicitation available on

Charles Koch Foundation
Grants for undergrad and graduate research
Application Deadline: 02/01/2020

The Foundation accepts grants on a rolling basis. There are no deadline.The Foundation supports educational initiatives in economics, philosophy, entrepreneurship, criminal justice, and other disciplines that have a direct impact on opportunities to thrive.  For more information, visit the sponsor website